Posts Tagged ‘Okinawa’

The Okinawan Sweet Potato

The Okinawan sweet potato was one of the few things that I missed out on when we visited Okinawa. There, purple sweet potatoes are a part of the culture in the cooler months of autumn and winter. Small trucks with ovens on the back go around selling fresh roasted sweet potatoes. I hear they are…

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Veggies Please! How to Increase Vegetables

Okinawan elders live longer, more physically active lives well into old age. And later they spend less years in nursing homes at the end of life. One of the things that helps them keep robust physical health is their diet. And the most obvious difference in nutrition? Okinawans traditionally eat a lot more veggies than…

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Vegetables of Okinawa: Top 10

The traditional Okinawan diet had over seven times more vegetables than the modern American diet. Why does this matter? Many tout the diet of elders in Okinawa as one of the main reasons they live active, healthy lives to over 100 years old. The biggest difference in nutrition? Okinawans traditionally fill up on vegetables (instead…

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Reason to Wake up Daily

Do you have a reason to wake up in the morning? If not, now is the time to get one! The New Year is a great time to reflect on where we are, and what we’d like to do to improve upon that. Enter ikigai: it is just one of the many habits and lifestyle…

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9 Ways to Live Longer

We can learn a lot from Okinawan elders. Not just awesome karate, but we can all adopt their ways to live longer. Okinawa is known for having the highest population of adults over 100 years old, and more importantly, the longest disability-free life expectancy in the world, meaning they tend to live longer, higher quality…

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TODE SAKUGAWA: FATHER OF KARATE

(Kanga “Tode”) Sakugawa  lived from 1733 to 1815. Tode Sakugawa was known in his youth as Kanga Sakugawa.  He was an Okinawan martial artist and greatly contributed to the evolution of karate, or “Tode,” as it was known at the time.  He studied under at least two separate masters: Takahara Peichin and Kusanku. Oral tradition…

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Maneki Neko – Lucky Cat

A Japanese Folktale retold by Jenifer Tull-Gauger There was once a poor monk who lived in a temple out in the country.  He took care of this place as best he could, but it was old and needed repairs.  The monk was lucky to have rice and a little fish to eat each day.  Still,…

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Preserving and Promoting

by Jenifer Tull-Gauger When I was around green belt, I went for the first time to participate in my dojo’s karate demo at a library.  Since then, I have been a part of demonstrating with my dojo at neighborhood block parties, a pre-school and elementary schools, Mesquite High School, a NOVA tournament, Superstition Springs Mall,…

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OKINAWA TRIP 21: GRAND FINALE

By Jenifer Tull-Gauger On the first leg of our Okinawa trip, we stopped overnight in Hawaii, and got to witness a beautiful sunset along with a rainbow.  That night inspired this haiku: Waikiki sunset! tourists clamor in the street soba in bellies Here are two highlights of our trip on video, as promised.  These kata…

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OKINAWA TRIP 20: HAWAII OKINAWAN CULTURAL CENTER

By Jenifer Tull-Gauger We were able to stop over in Hawaii for two full days, plus a little longer, before we landed on the mainland (U. S. A.).  Several years prior, I had come across the Hawaii United Okinawa Association online while researching Okinawa.  I had determined then that if I ever went to Hawaii,…

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